Arugula: Flavorful nutrition

Arugula is a health superstar, boasting an impressive roster of nutritional benefits that come at a small caloric price – meaning you can munch on the peppery green without worrying about your waistline.1

Arugula is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, containing antioxidants and phytochemicals, called indoles, that may help decrease inflammation and lower the risk of certain chronic diseases, and may help to reduce the risk of breast and prostate cancer, respectively. Additionally, the carotenoids found in green, leafy vegetables such as arugula may lower the risk of certain types of cancer, particularly prostate cancer.

Arugula is rich in vitamin A, an essential vitamin necessary for normal vision, skin health, and maintaining immune function.2

It’s also an excellent source of vitamin C, which protects the body against free radicals. Vitamin C also supports the normal function of blood vessels and healing of wounds, iron absorption, and neurological function.3

Arugula is an excellent source of Vitamin K, which forms and strengthens the bones and limits neuronal damage in the brain.4

Along with essential vitamins, arugula is a good source of calcium, a mineral needed for normal structure of bones and teeth, nerve and muscle function, and the function of digestive enzymes. In addition, calcium helps maintain healthy blood pressure and contributes to the release of hormones, such as insulin.5

Arugula puts the pro in produce with big flavor and even bigger health benefits. Scoring a respectable 604 on the Aggregate Nutritional Density Index (ANDI), arugula is in the top 10 most nutritionally dense foods on the planet along with other superfoods including watercress, kale, mustard greens, and spinach.

1 US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nutrient Data Laboratory. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28. Version Current: September 2015, slightly revised May 2016. Internet: /nea/bhnrc/ndl. USDA 11959; Arugula, raw.
2 “Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin A.” National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.
3 “Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin C.” National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.
4 “Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin K.” National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.
5 “Office of Dietary Supplements – Dietary Supplement Fact Sheet: Calcium.” National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, n.d. Web. 10 Apr. 2017.